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Teaching Constitutional Law Within Political Science Departments: Sacrificing Traditional Breadth to Achieve Political Science Goals

October 19, 2020

This essay is part of Educate’s Political Science Educator reading list.

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Getting Involved in Research on Teaching and Learning at a Large Research University: A Case Study

October 19, 2020

Kenneth W. Foster • Concordia College  This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s February 2008 issue. When I took up an assistant professor position in 2003 at the University of British Columbia (UBC—I left this past summer, as discussed below), I had received little training in pedagogy and was focused completely on doing…

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Shaping Private Spiritedness? Lessons About Citizenship from Service Learning and the Fifth Grade

October 19, 2020

Lanethea Mathews-Gardner • Muhlenberg College This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s April 2007 issue.   This essay explores several important pedagogical lessons that emerged from a multiple-semester service learning partnership between students in introductory American National Government classes at Muhlenberg College and fifth graders at Jefferson Elementary School in Allentown, Pennsylvania. The partnership…

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Constitutional Engineers: Using Problem Based Learning in Comparative Politics

October 19, 2020

John Ishiyama • Truman State University This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s April 2007 edition.   “Active learning” is a buzzword in higher education. There is good reason to believe that it promotes student learning better than “passive” approaches (Shellman and Turan, 2006). Active learning leads to deeper learning of abstract concepts. Brock…

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Public Administration with a Comparative Focus: Comparison for the Purpose of Identifying Public Purpose

October 19, 2020

Nancy E. Wright • Long Island University – Brooklyn This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s December 2006 edition.  American university students typically have two paths by which to take courses in public administration—through a department or school awarding degrees in public administration or through a political science department. The former offers the…

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Developing Analytical Tools in Introductory International Politics Classes: Different Perspectives are not for Entertainment Purposes

October 19, 2020

Mark Sachleben • Shippensburg University This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s December 2006 edition.   As Scott Erb pointed out in a previous issue of this publication, students often become angry with themselves for being ignorant of international situations. I also have found that students are bemused and embarrassed by the lack of…

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Developing Global Citizenship: Introducing a Teaching Toolkit

October 19, 2020

Henrike Lehnguth • University of Maryland, College Park Jenny Wüstenberg • University of Maryland, College Park This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s December 2006 edition. Ask any college teacher about the global awareness and knowledge displayed by his or her undergraduates and you will likely receive a response rife with frustration. A…

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Encouraging Reading and Discussion in Upper-Level Coursework

October 19, 2020

Maria Rost Rublee • University of Tampa This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s December 2006 edition.   My upper-level political science classes are focused on reading, discussion, writing, and presentations. I want students to grapple with material on their own, analyze it to produce their own insights, and come to class prepared to…

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Teaching American Politics: The Politics of Incorporating Multicultural Highlights Into a Traditional Curriculum

October 19, 2020

Gus Jones, Jr. • Miami University Michelle G. Briscoe • Miami University This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s April 2006 edition. Census reports reveal that the U.S. is increasingly becoming a multi-cultural, multi-lingual and a multi-racial society. Aware of these demographic trends, colleges and universities are scrambling to formulate and implement curricula…

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Getting Started With SOTL

October 19, 2020

Jeffrey Bernstein • Eastern Michigan University  John Ishiyama • Truman State University This essay originally appeared in the Political Science Educator’s April 2006 edition.   During the 2006 American Political Science Association Teaching and Learning Conference, we were pleased to do a workshop that introduced colleagues to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) and offered…

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